Archive for the ‘Media Literacy’ Category

As celebrity slurs go, Alec Baldwin’s latest in a long string of meltdowns was a real doozy. Baldwin’s temper tantrum—in which he tweeted a vile barrage of hateful gay slurs at George Stark, a writer for The Daily Mail—netted a collective yawn from the Follywood Elite and the PC crowd. Why no outcry?

Hillary Rosen, a Democratic activist and former college buddy of Baldwin, told The Post: “What he said was disgusting. But I think he has a deeper reservoir of good will among folks because he’s been a progressive ally and fighter for progressive causes for years.”

Translation: It’s okay to spew violent, homophobic threats as long as you’re a “progressive” supporting liberal causes.

Baldwin later claimed his “ill-advised attack . . . had absolutely nothing to do with issues of anyone’s sexual orientation.” Huh? He calls a gay reporter for The Daily Mail a “toxic little queen” and then has the audacity to think we’re dolts by denying his slur was about “anyone’s sexual orientation.” Classic double-speak.

Just for fun, read the following now-scrubbed Twitter posts by Alec Baldwin. Then imagine the firestorm and career-ending damage that would have ensued if the same hate-speech had been tweeted by conservative talk show hosts Michael Savage, Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, or Glenn Beck.

Alec Baldwin tweetsSure sounds like this guy needs a vacation . . . and some anger management classes. I’m not the only one asking what’s up with the double standard. CNN anchorman Anderson Cooper (who is gay) tweeted: “Why does #AlecBaldwin get a pass when he uses gay slurs? If a conservative talked of beating up a ‘queen’ they would be vilified.”

Bonus round: Picture the media feeding frenzy that would ensue if Sarah Palin had tweeted the same thing Alec Baldwin had said. Just saying . . .

Same day. Same confession. Different outcomes.

I’m referring to June 19, 2013, a day Paula Deen will never forget. That’s the date when her use of the n-word 30-years ago made headlines prompting corporate sponsors to cut Paula’s endorsement deals worth more than $12.5 million.

On the same day, Kid Rock appeared on Howard Stern where Rock admitted:

We all use the n-word. We call each other the n-word all the time. We cut it up. My dentist’s name is Taco. We say stuff like that all the time ‘What’s up my ni66er?’ We’re just living up pop-culture. We just call it like it is, like band members do in privacy.

Shock jock Stern went on to ask whether or not Kid Rock used the n-word around his son—who happens to be half black. Answer? “Why can’t I say the n-word to him?” Nice.

Ironically, not a peep from the same press that skewered Paula Deen about this double standard. What’s more, not one sponsor has backed away from Kid Rock. Not Harley-Davidson. Not Jim Bean. Oh, and not Walmart—which is selling tickets for his current beer-buzz tour.

Let me get this straight. Walmart drops all of Paula Deen’s products because she used the n-word once three decades ago, but has no qualms about selling Kid Rock tickets who admits using the word “all the time” today.

Hey Mike Duke (President and CEO of Walmart) . . . you’re needed at the office.

The Queen of Cooking Paula Deen is in hot water. Her critics are boiling mad that she used the N-word decades ago. Sponsors like Home Depot, Target, Walmart and the Food Network are dropping her like a hot potato. Their argument is half-baked at best.

I’m not a fan of the N-word and, for the record, I haven’t used it myself. But the hypocrisy from the politically correct crowd is stunning. Where was the same outrage when Ludacris—President Obama’s favorite rapper—wrote the little ditty “Too Many Niggas Not Enough Hoes“?

Take Eminem, who used the N-word back in 1993. He claims the rap was “made out of anger, stupidity and frustration when I was a teenager.” At the time he rapped, “All the girls I like to bone have big butts/ No they don’t, ’cause I don’t like that n***er shit/ I’m just here to make a bigger hit.” N-word aside, gotta like his view of women.

Rapper 50 Cent, who uses the N-word constantly, told NBC’s Today Show, “I’m not using it as a racial slur . . . It’s just slang.” He gets a pass from the left for raps like “To All My Niggars“and “The Realset Niggars“.

Then there’s Jesse Jackson who called then Sen. Barack Obama the N-word for which he has apologized—good for him. Not to mention Def Jam founder Russell Simmons who defended the use of the N-word, saying, “When we say ‘nigger’ now, it’s very positive.”

If the N-word is so “very positive” now, why does Paula Deen get a bad rap? To her credit, Paula has apologized several times. Can’t say the same thing about Ludacris, 50 Cent, or any number of rappers who have sold millions of albums with the N-word. This begs the question: Why are Walmart and Target still carrying their albums, books and videos?

I realize we’re in Breast Cancer Awareness Month. I just didn’t expect for a woman to bare her breasts 6” from my face on an airplane. This isn’t an April Fools gag; it’s October after all. I’m telling you the naked truth. The encounter happened on DELTA Flight #16 last Saturday.

One minute this thirty-something blonde was fully clothed. The next moment she stripped off her top revealing what Solomon poetically describes as “two fawns, like twin fawns of a gazelle” (7:3 NIV). These “fawns” were au naturel, as in “naked as a jaybird.”

A wardrobe malfunction? Nope. This was a deliberate full frontal exposure.

Not to quibble with the wisest man who ever lived, but Solomon was mistaken when he quipped, “There is nothing new under the sun.” After all, I’ve traveled more than 511,000 miles on DELTA and that has never happened to me before. (more…)

I never met New York magazine columnist Jonathan Chait. If I have the opportunity to meet him one day, I’ll be sure to buy him lunch. After all, finding an honest liberal commentator on pop culture these days is about as rare as sighting an albino crow.

In a recent piece, The Vast Left-Wing Conspiracy Is on Your Screen, Chait finally admits what conservatives used to argue, namely, that TV programming is a vast wasteland of liberal indoctrination.

Regarding Hollywood’s impact, he notes that “A trio of communications professors found that watching Will & Grace made audiences more receptive to gay rights.” Furthermore, “When Joe Biden endorsed gay marriage in May, he cited Will & Grace as the single-most important driving force in transforming public opinion on the subject.” Although I’d suggest Glee makes Will & Grace look like a couple of lightweights by comparison.

If conceding that a connection exists between extreme liberal values on TV screen and a values shift in the culture wasn’t brave enough, this self-proclaimed “liberal hawk” does something I can’t say I’ve ever witnessed any liberal journalist do—he invites his reader to empathize with conservatives:

“…think of it from the conservative point of view, if you don’t happen to be one. Imagine that large chunks of your entertainment mocked your values and even transformed once-uncontroversial beliefs of yours into a kind of bigotry that might be greeted with revulsion. You’d probably be angry, too.”

However, he rightly points out that conservatives have largely stopped publicly holding Hollywood accountable for the daily dose of excrement they shovel into our living rooms via TV. Which begs a question: Why do millions of people in fly-over country wear a muzzle when Follywood producers mock, trample upon, and vilify their core beliefs?

Chait confessions “The more uncomfortable reality is that the culture war is an ongoing liberal rout. Hollywood is as liberal as ever, and conservatives have simply despaired of changing it.” Some might argue that we shouldn’t impose our values on others. Ah, yes, but clearly Hollywood doesn’t have that issue, do they?

That said, it’s 20 years after the fact—but hats off to this brave soul for having the hutzpah to say we conservatives are right about Hollywood’s role in corrupting our culture. I wonder if he saw the light because he got married and had two children . . . funny how that works.

“You ain’t heard nothing yet.” The year, 1927. The film, The Jazz Singer. And, with those words, singer/actor Al Johnson ushered in the era of the “talkies”—talking motion pictures. His statement has proven to be prophetic.

It’s hard to believe what we’re hearing—and seeing—in popular films and on television today. Someone once said, “It took 50 years for films to go from silent to unspeakable.” I couldn’t agree more.

Just how far has Hollywood—and, in turn, we consumers—drifted from their original standards of decency?

Introduced in 1930, the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America defined basic standards of “good taste” and a list of do’s and don’t’s that previously governed the production of all films released by Hollywood.

By July 1, 1934, strict adherence to the code’s provisions were enforced. Few producers wanted to risk the wrath of the MPPDA and forfeit the Production Code Seal of approval—a sure bet your movie would never be shown on television, too.

One of the overriding principles of the original production code stated:

“No picture shall be produced which will lower the standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.”

Yes, the original code used the “S”-word. Or how about this doozy:

“Excessive and lustful kissing, lustful embracing, suggestive postures and gestures, are not to be shown.”

I bet the following 10 additional provisions in the code would send our modern crop of “Follywood” producers into cardiac arrest: (more…)

This might come as a surprise to you, but I love rap music. Give me Eminem, Snoop Dogg, or Dr. Dre any day—awwww yeah! I especially love listening to rap music when it’s played at full volume . . . three hundred miles out in the middle of the Atlantic ocean!

Okay, so I lied. I’m not really a hip hop fan.

Let’s just say I’ve never managed to get into Eminem’s whole crotch-grabbing scene. Besides, I just think his music is crap.

However, the fact that I, as a 50-something white boy, wouldn’t buy an Eminem album to save my life doesn’t mean that I have a right to sit in judgment of teenagers who do—or so I’ve been told.

And, frankly, I’m working to come to terms with that reality. You see, according to the Enlightened Ones who move among us, you and I are disqualified to make value judgments about the merits of today’s hip hop and hoodlum music industry for at least three reasons:

1)    We think a “crib” is the place where a baby sleeps

2)    We think a drive-by is hip slang for a drive-thru

3)    Wearing gold chains around our necks just gets in the way of our walkers.

The sooner you and I make peace with the fact we’re from the medieval times, the better. We’re just parents. We’re not music experts.

We’re not cool like the tattooed-gods with gold-capped teeth on MTV who drive around the streets of Hollywood in the latest armor-plated Hummer. What could we possibly know, I mean really know about the music industry? Nor are we as smart as the music editors at RollingStoned magazine or the executive vidiots at MTV who are clearly the authorities on what’s best for our children.

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