Posts Tagged ‘politics’

As celebrity slurs go, Alec Baldwin’s latest in a long string of meltdowns was a real doozy. Baldwin’s temper tantrum—in which he tweeted a vile barrage of hateful gay slurs at George Stark, a writer for The Daily Mail—netted a collective yawn from the Follywood Elite and the PC crowd. Why no outcry?

Hillary Rosen, a Democratic activist and former college buddy of Baldwin, told The Post: “What he said was disgusting. But I think he has a deeper reservoir of good will among folks because he’s been a progressive ally and fighter for progressive causes for years.”

Translation: It’s okay to spew violent, homophobic threats as long as you’re a “progressive” supporting liberal causes.

Baldwin later claimed his “ill-advised attack . . . had absolutely nothing to do with issues of anyone’s sexual orientation.” Huh? He calls a gay reporter for The Daily Mail a “toxic little queen” and then has the audacity to think we’re dolts by denying his slur was about “anyone’s sexual orientation.” Classic double-speak.

Just for fun, read the following now-scrubbed Twitter posts by Alec Baldwin. Then imagine the firestorm and career-ending damage that would have ensued if the same hate-speech had been tweeted by conservative talk show hosts Michael Savage, Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, or Glenn Beck.

Alec Baldwin tweetsSure sounds like this guy needs a vacation . . . and some anger management classes. I’m not the only one asking what’s up with the double standard. CNN anchorman Anderson Cooper (who is gay) tweeted: “Why does #AlecBaldwin get a pass when he uses gay slurs? If a conservative talked of beating up a ‘queen’ they would be vilified.”

Bonus round: Picture the media feeding frenzy that would ensue if Sarah Palin had tweeted the same thing Alec Baldwin had said. Just saying . . .

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I had a rather interesting 2.5 hour conversation with a man on the flight back from LA last weekend. We couldn’t have been coming from more polar opposite perspectives. He’s gay. I’m straight. He’s a Democrat. I vote Republican. He’s pro-Obama. I think Obama’s policies are fiscally, morally, and nationally irresponsible. He’s living with his male partner. I live with a wife and kids. And yet, God was in the middle of that conversation. Throughout, I wanted him to know that while I have a very different set of moral values, I respected him as someone made in the image of God.

We talked about everything from taxes and fiscal policies to the debate over the definition of marriage. Perhaps the most important part of the conversation was when we talked about his being excommunicated at age 19 from the Church of God for his same-sex attraction. When I asked him how that impacted his view of God, he said, “I’m not sure how God could call my love for the man that I’ve been living with for 28 years ‘sin’ when everything about our relationship feels so right.”

How did he reconcile that? “I just don’t call it sin.”

At that point I told him that the whole point of Christianity isn’t “sin management” but falling in love with Jesus. Besides, we don’t get to make the call as to whether or not something is sinful; that’s God’s call. I shared something that my pastor Jack Miller back in Philly used to often say: “Cheer up—you’re worse off than you know . . . and you’re loved more than you can comprehend.” What’s more, that my sin was no different than his sin—and in both of our cases Jesus loves us unconditionally.

As we were leaving, he said how much he appreciated the conversation and the respect he felt throughout. He mentioned that feeling several times which impressed upon me how important honoring and respecting and loving those with whom we disagree is so important for any meaningful communication to take place. Meanwhile, I’m praying that the Holy Spirit will be pleased to work in his life, first and foremost, to know how much he is loved by Jesus.